Recruitment Myths You Need To Know As You Search for Employment [Part 2]

In the first part of this article we looked at six (6) recruitment myths job seekers need to beware of in their search for employment. I understand the challenges job seekers face in trying to land that dream job and have shared this as part of my goal to make job search easier for people. In this edition, I discuss the concluding part of the article – six additional myths (Myths 8 – 12) below. So let’s go.

Myth 8: An Unsolicited Application Will Receive Attention:  

A single recruitment process consumes hours and can take several days or weeks.  As a result, attention and time is usually given to on-going recruitment and less if any to unsolicited job applications.  Some people do get lucky, but the chances are slim, especially with most organisations that have a policy against unsolicited applications. 

My suggestion, before you submit an unsolicited application, research to ensure that it is a position such an organisation advertises very often.   Example, an unsolicited job application to an organisation that frequently advertises for a software developer or a customer relationship officer has more chances than a position that is rarely advertised by such an organisation.  Trust me, I have erred in this severally as an applicant, and now we receive several unsolicited job applications for positions our clients are not seeking and we are unable to address every single one of them.

Myth 7: My Job Application Gets Noticed But Ignored:

Again from Myths 1 and 2 discussed in Part 1, we have seen how it is possible for job applications not to get noticed. Recruiters do not deliberately ignore applications. Remember organisations are run by humans and operate in environments, so things happen. When a candidate’s job application does not get noticed, it does not always mean that he/she is a bad fit, it was just not noticed and someone was chosen.  It is always best in such a circumstance, to move on fast to the next opportunity.

Myth 9: Applicant’s Work Experience and Qualifications Makes Him or Her Fit:

Candidates are usually surprised when they receive a rejection email, especially if they have performed well at an interview with a line-up of work experience and qualifications also going for them.  

Great work experience and qualifications are not the only ticket that gets us a job offer (also see Myth 12 below).  There are several factors that organisations consider in a recruitment decision.  This means that a candidate may rate high in some criteria, but miss out in some key ones and therefore will not be chosen.  Again, such a situation does not make such a person unsuitable for all jobs; he/she has just not been found suitable as presented by the organisation’s current need, situation or circumstance. 

Myth 10: Recruitment Decision is Taken Speedily:

Things happen for individuals and organisations.  For instance, an organisation may interview with a contract or expansion, then hit roadblock internally or externally. There are also instances where circumstances put organisations in a state of indecisions after they have identified suitable candidates.  

Such and many other factors can cause a lack of or delay in communication especially where intricate confidential matters are involved.  Say, a key person leaves an organisation, company goes bankrupt, company is in debt, office politics or bureaucracy, change in organisational direction, sudden awareness of limited budget or delay in a particular project execution, environmental issues causing change in business priority.  

Delicate matters such as any of these could delay recruitment decisions much longer than even an organisation or a recruiter anticipates. These are partly reasons why some candidates get called for employment six months after they have forgotten about such a job opening or never get called even after they have reached the final rigorous interview stage.

Myth 11: Recruiters Should Settle for Something:

I see some job applicants apply for jobs where they are indirect fits. People call this, trying luck.   Truth is that a recruiter will focus his/her limited hours on candidates that are potentially fits.   

My advice to avoid this trap is to properly read the job announcement and apply for jobs where you meet the criteria as near as possible and where your skills and potentials give you better chances.  There are organisations in need of your skills, find them.  

Myth 12: Any Interview That Does Not End with a Job Offer Means Failure:

I have seen CEOs make recruitment decisions on the basis of ‘connection’ with a candidate; or a candidate’s likely fit into an existing team or culture. None of these has anything to do with a candidate’s competency, but an organisation’s peculiar need and circumstance.  When this happens, such a candidate was just found unfit in line with an organisation’s core need or issues, but could be a great fit somewhere else.

As mentioned above, things happen for people and organisations that completely disrupt organisational plans and impact recruitment processes and decisions.  

It is important not to allow interview outcomes to define who you are or affect your self-esteem.  Learn from any mistake you may have identified and improve your skills for future opportunities.

Therefore, for every interview that does not end with an offer, find the job and organisation where you will be a fit. Your opportunity awaits you.

In Conclusion, you can manage your emotions and expectations better when you remember that there are lots of human factors, environmental, socio-economic, political, governmental and natural situations that go on in organisations;  that could impact how your job application is handled.  If one door did not open, simply knock the next, and keep knocking till a door is open for you.  

Here you have them, 12 Recruitment Myths You Need To Know as You Search for Employment. This list is definitely not exhaustive, but has covered some important points of note.  This post is not written in defense of recruiters, but to give a preview of issues around recruitment that will help persons seeking employment better manage their expectations and more importantly their emotional well-being.

I hope this has been helpful.  If you like what you have read, do visit the Resources –Careers’ section of my website http://www.afomauchendu.com for more job search and career guides. And remember to click the share button to share this with your network, like, comment or ask questions below. I will be glad to interact with you.

My best wishes in your career journey.

Kind Regards,

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